Nature For Justice

Our Mission

We aim for a more just world where people and nature work in tandem to confront the impact of the climate crisis.

We are doing this by mobilizing funds and provide the necessary technical resources to leading, in-country organizations working with local communities to achieve climate resiliency.

A major focus of ours is to advocate for at-risk communities, especially indigenous peoples, confronting the climate crisis.

We believe strongly in Nature-based Solutions and we will ensure fairness in the distribution of financial and carbon-based benefits to local participating communities.

Our work will stand up to the rigors of transparency, peer review, and industry standards.

To scale our impact, we plan to accelerate and replicate successful landscape management techniques such as restoration, improved management, and forest protection.

Recent science has demonstrated that these practices can contribute to over 30 percent of the solution in meeting the Paris agreement target.

Our Impact

It has been barerly two years since we formally launched N4J so it is too soon to talk about impacts.

We have launched a number of initiatives:

 developing program leadership teams

 launching feasibility studies

 designing a talent pipeline, and

 putting in place systems to be able to describe transparently the measurable impacts we are having on social inclusion, economic development, and partner capacity.

The results will allow us to take an adaptive management approach to our work with communities. And set the stage to be able to scale up these programs on an accelerated timeframe.

Overall, the aim is to create nature-based solutions to climate change and provide for economic development, as we conserve and protect nature in the places where we work.

Our Initiatives

Nature For Justice has active projects or projects in development in 13 countries in the Americas, Africa, and the Asia-Pacific region.
United States
Our cornerstone U.S. program is with Black, Indigenous, and persons of color farmers in the southeastern United States as we work to connect these farmers affected by climate change to resources that can help mitigate those impacts.
Canada

In Canada, Steve Nitah, the former chief of the Lutsel K’e Dene Nation and a former senior advisor to the Indigenous Leadership Initiative, has joined N4J as Managing Director – Indigenous Relations.

Also in Canada

Also in Canada, our work with the Little Red River Cree is progressing by looking at ways to provide income from carbon sales, protect populations of Woodland Caribou and bison, and hire local First Nation members as Guardians.

South Africa

Our project with the Gouritz Cluster Biosphere Reserve in Western Cape, South Africa, is now in Phase 2 as we evaluate opportunities for regenerative agriculture and restoration using the indigenous plant, Spekboom.

Large Africa Program

We have signed a major program agreement to work in five African countries (Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, South Africa, and Ghana). Our ambition is to establish 30 community-based carbon projects.

Ghana

The first of the Africa Program projects has kicked off in the Togo Range, Ghana, with our local partner, Nature Conservation Research Center.

Ecuador

N4J is supporting Fundación Los Aliados in its work with marginalized communities affected by the climate crisis in a critically important region of the Andean-Amazon slope. We are helping to train agriculture extension personnel to promote improved farmer income.

N4J Catalyst

N4J Catalyst, our sister public benefit corporation that is majority-owned by Nature For Justice, has four consulting projects and is contributing unrestricted revenues to the non-profit side of our work.

Our Approach

 Employ Nature-based solutions that promote resilience at the community level

 Connect these vulnerable communities with financial and technical resources

 Improve the organizational capacity of our implementing partners

 Use quality data for actionable insights and rigorously measure the results

 Achieve scale through replication and policy development